Friendly Team. Fantastic Choice. Fabulous Locations.

Beaches around Snowdonia and Lleyn Peninsula

North Wales not only offers the magnificent rural views of the Snowdonia National Park, but has an amazing range of sandy beaches for you to relax on with your friends and family. Images: © Crown copyright (2014) Visit Wales

Morfa Nefyn Beach

Morfa Nefyn Beach

A sandy beach on the north of the Lleyn peninsula, Morfa Nefyn is north-west of Pwllheli. Along the beach to the west is the small, picturesque fishing hamlet of Porthdinllaen with its well known pub, Ty Coch. Food, toilets, National Trust car park at top of cliffs, dogs allowed. Good Beach Guide Recommended.

Aberdaron Beach

Aberdaron Beach

A mile-long sandy bay situated at the end of the Lleyn peninsula with plenty to explore, including some sea caves and rock pools - take care that you don’t get cut off by the incoming tide. Food, toilets, slipway and pay parking; dog restrictions apply May to September. Blue Flag; Seaside Award; Good Beach Guide Recommended.

Porth Neigwl (Hell's Mouth)

Porth Neigwl (Hell's Mouth)

A south-west facing rural beach that is frequented by surfers and kayakers because of the relatively large waves. It is a gently shelving beach, consisting mainly of medium sized pebbles at high tide but with vast expanses of sand at low tide. Nowadays you will see brave surfers rather than shipwrecks at Hell’s Mouth, exposed to the full force of the Atlantic. Toilets, small car park with a well-maintained 200yd footpath to the beach; beach cleaned weekly. Green Coast Award; Seaside Award; Good Beach Guide Recommended.

Abersoch Beach

Abersoch Beach

Abersoch was originally a fishing port; now a popular and stylish seaside resort with a fine beach of golden sand and specific areas for watersports centre with all the aquatic activity you can handle in its sheltered waters directly offshore - wakeboarding for example. Dog restrictions apply May to September. Blue Flag; Seaside Award; Good Beach Guide Recommended.

Pwllheli Beach

Pwllheli Beach

A vast expanse of sand with landscaped dune areas and exceptional views to Cardigan Bay; a seafront promenade and child friendly beach which is in a Special Area of Conservation. Known as the 'capital' of the Lleyn, Pwllheli is an unusual mix of market town and seaside. It is also a high quality sailing destination with a Blue Flag marina and a watersports centre with sea canoeing, jet skiing, windsurfing, power boating and water skiing; craft exclusion zone and craft byelaws are in force. Toilets, food and shops, free parking for 280 cars, beach cleaned daily; dog restrictions apply May to September. Blue Flag; Seaside Award; Good Beach Guide Recommended.

Abererch Beach

Abererch Beach

The eastern and more exposed end of the sandy Pwllheli beach. Like other beaches along Lleyn’s south coast, it enjoys breathtaking views across the bay to Harlech and Snowdonia. It’s just a pebble’s throw from here to popular Pwllheli, the ‘capital’ of Lleyn. Toilets, limited parking available. Seaside Award; Good Beach Guide Recommended.

Criccieth Beach

Criccieth Beach

The town sits behind a rocky headland dominated by a C13th castle; this sandy beach stretches west from the town towards Pwllheli. Toilets, food, shops, slipway, parking available a short walk from the beach, dog restrictions apply May to September. Seaside Award; Good Beach Guide Recommended.

Morfa Bychan (Black Rock Sands)

Morfa Bychan (Black Rock Sands)

Located south-west of Porthmadog, Black Rock Sands are backed by dunes at the northern edge of the mouth of Tremadog Bay. Coastal walks with some spectacular scenery in the area; the extensive intertidal area provides a feeding ground for various bird species. Shops and slipway with parking available adjacent or further north behind the dunes; dog restrictions apply May to September. Blue Flag; Seaside Award; Good Beach Guide Recommended.

Dinas Dinlle Beach

Dinas Dinlle Beach

A large expanse of beach with vast areas of sand from mid-tide level; the foreshore consists of natural pebble banks and there are exceptional views towards the Llyn Peninsula and towards Llanddwyn Island on Anglesey. It is close to the Marine Local Nature Reserve at Foryd Bay; traffic free cycle and walking tracks are close by. The beach is used for swimming, scuba diving, surfing, sea canoeing, sailing, jet skiing, windsurfing, power boating, fishing and snorkelling; a craft exclusion zone is enforced. Toilets, food, shops, two slipways, beach cleaned daily, free parking for 350 cars, dog restrictions apply May to September. Blue Flag; Seaside Award; Good Beach Guide Recommended.

Llanfairfechan Beach

Llanfairfechan Beach

The small, mountain-backed seaside resort of Llanfairfechan remains faithful to its Victorian roots. It’s one of the North Wales coast’s quieter beaches, with a pretty promenade, amusements and a pebbly beach at high tide with low tide revealing a long open stretch of sand. Toilets, food, slipway, beach cleaned regularly, free parking available for over 100 cars, dog restrictions apply May to September. Seaside Award; Good Beach Guide Recommended.

Penmaenmawr Beach

Penmaenmawr Beach

A long sandy beach with a recently refurbished promenade, Penmaenmawr looks out onto the Menai Straits and its many facilities make it a popular family resort. Activities include windsurfing sailing and canoeing and there is a skate park on the promenade. Ample parking, dog restrictions apply apply on part of beach May to September. Seaside Award; Good Beach Guide Recommended.

Llandudno - North & West shores

Llandudno - North & West shores

North Shore - The largest seaside resort in Wales with a wide sweep of sand, shingle and rock which extends for two miles between the headlands of the Great Orme and the Little Orme; for most of this distance, Llandudno’s North Shore has a Victorian promenade and the 1,234ft long pier was built in 1878. Toilets, shops, slipway, extensive parking is available though there is a charge at most car parks; dog restrictions apply on part of beach May to September. West Shore - A quieter side to Llandudno than the popular north shore. This is a sandy beach, facing into Conwy Bay where low tide reveals a large expanse of sand; coastal path with walks to the nearby Great Orme. The large expanse of shallow water makes this an ideal spot for kite surfing and the extensive sands at low tide create good conditions for kite buggying. Toilets, car park next to the beach, dog restrictions apply. Seaside Award.

Colwyn Bay & Old Colwyn beach

Colwyn Bay & Old Colwyn beach

Colwyn Bay - A long sand and shingle beach backed by a promenade seafront walk with cafes and shops at this popular resort. Toilets, slipway, free and pay parking available; dog restrictions apply on part of beach May to September. Old Colwyn - This sandy beach is a short walk from the town of Colwyn Bay; local selection of restaurants and cafes, a promenade with benches and refreshment kiosks. Toilets, food, parking available next to the beach, dogs are allowed. Seaside Award; Good Beach Guide Recommended.

Abergele Beach - Pensarn

Abergele Beach - Pensarn

A long sweeping shingle and pebble beach extending from Llandulas in the west to Kinmel Bay in the east with views to the Little Orme at Llandudno. Car parking adjacent to the shops and cafe with further parking next to the beach, toilets, promenade, dog restrictions May to September on part of beach. Seaside Award; Good Beach Guide Recommended.

Harlech Beach

Harlech Beach

Harlech’s beach stretches from the Glaslyn estuary in the north to Llandanwg in the south. A sandy beach backed by dunes within the Snowdonia National Park; National Nature Reserve. Originally built next to the sea, the changing nature of the coastline means that the C13th Harlech castle now lies on a cliff face, about half a mile inland; Royal St David’s golf course. Pay car park, toilets, disabled toilets; dog restrictions apply May to September. Green Coast Award; Seaside Award; Good Beach Guide Recommended.

Llandanwg Beach

Llandanwg Beach

A sandy beach at the southern end of Tremadog Bay within the Snowdonia National Park and south-west of Harlech. It is backed by an estuary and hidden in the dunes is a small C13th church which has a wonderful interior and is open daily; plenty of coastal walks and walks into the National park. Pay parking, food, toilets, dog restrictions apply May to September. Seaside Award; Good Beach Guide Recommended.

Dyffryn Beach - Llanendwyn

Dyffryn Beach - Llanendwyn

Dyffryn is a long sandy beach backed by an extensive sand dune system between Shell Island and Dyffryn Ardudwy. A footpath from a caravan site leads north behind the dune system to Shell Island and the beach beyond. The shoreline is good for birds, especially during the winter months. The dunes form the Morfa Dyffryn National Nature Reserve cared for by the Countryside Council for Wales and is highly protected. Unlike many other sand dunes in Wales, Morfa Dyffryn’s dunes are constantly changing. The front dunes are steep and the wind blows sand through the many gaps in these dunes, changing their shape and burying much of the old habitat. Public car park and toilets right next to the beach (travelling north, turn left where signposted just after Tal-y-bont). Green Coast Award; Seaside Award; Good Beach Guide Recommended.

Tal-y-Bont Beach (Traeth Bennar)

Tal-y-Bont Beach (Traeth Bennar)

Also known as Bennar Beach, Tal-y-bont forms part of the large sand dune system of Morfa Dyffryn. During the last few years a shingle bank has developed along the high water mark. The beach is within a Site of Special Scientific Interest and adjacent to the Morfa Dyffryn National Nature Reserve. There are a variety of plants including orchids and sharp sea rush and many bird species including ringed plover and cormorants. Free car parking for 200 vehicles is available, toilets, beach cleaned daily manually and mechanically, dog restrictions apply May to September. Seaside Award; Good Beach Guide Recommended.

Barmouth Beach

Barmouth Beach

A popular family destination on Cardigan Bay with its 2 mile long golden sand and west facing beach that is perfect for sunbathing, games, kite flying, and water sports; promenade, donkey rides, swing boats and amusement arcades. At low tide it is possible to walk as far as Harlech to the north with wonderful views over Tremadog Bay. Pay parking available next to the beach, toilets, food and shops; dogs are allowed on long designated stretches of the beach - see sign posts on the sea wall. Blue Flag; Seaside Award; Good Beach Guide Recommended.

Fairbourne Beach

Fairbourne Beach

Two miles of sand backed by steep pebble banks stretching from the cliffs to the south of Fairbourne to the Mawddach estuary to the north; a vast amount of golden sandy beach is exposed from mid-tide. There is sufficient access to the beach for those visitors with prams and wheelchairs. The Fairbourne Railway runs alongside the beach to Penrhyn Point where there is a ferry across the Mawddach to Barmouth. Pay car parking, toilets, food and shops; dog restrictions apply May to September. Green Coast Award; Seaside Award; Good Beach Guide Recommended.

Tywyn Beach

Tywyn Beach

This sandy beach catches the westerly swells and is therefore popular with surfers; dolphins can sometimes be seen and there are good walks with spectacular views of Cardigan Bay. Bowling green and amusements arcades on the other side of the promenade; extensive dunes are to be found to the south towards Aberdyfi. Pay car parking, toilets, slipway, food and shops; dog restrictions apply May to September. Seaside Award; Good Beach Guide Recommended.